[unav_all] AGU session # 2851: What we have learned from 15 years of geodetic monitoring of inter- and post-seismic deformation, and what we still need to know

Mike Floyd mfloyd at MIT.EDU
Mon Jul 21 10:54:13 MDT 2014


Dear colleagues,

We would like to draw your attention to our AGU session # 2851, "What we have learned from 15 years of geodetic monitoring of inter- and post-seismic deformation, and what we still need to know" [T + G, NH, S]. The session description is below and more information may be found at https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/webprogrampreliminary/Session2851.html.

Please also encourage your colleagues that would be interested in such a session to submit an abstract accordingly.

Abstracts may be submitted through http://agu.confex.com/agu/fm14/t/papers/index.cgi?sessionid=2851 and must be completed by Wednesday 6 August 2014 at 23:59 ET.

We hope to see you in San Francisco in December!

Sincerely,

Mike Floyd, MIT, USA
Semih Ergintav, Bogazici University, Turkey
Simon McClusky, Australian National University, Australia
Eric Hetland, University of Michigan, USA

---

The 1999 Mw7.4 Izmit and Mw7.2 Ducze earthquakes on the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) in Turkey are among the earliest geodetically observed earthquakes. 15 years later, there is a rich geodetic record that includes pre-earthquake inter-seismic velocities, co-seismic displacements, and a long record of transient post-seismic deformation. Yet this window captures a small fraction of the earthquake cycle for the NAF, of which a complete understanding is important for assessing the earthquake hazard in the region. This session focuses on two inter-related questions: What have we learned from these geodetic observations, and what do we still need to know? We welcome contributions from data acquisition and processing (e.g. GPS, InSAR, gravity), and modeling studies based on the Izmit and Duzce post-seismic processes. We also encourage contributions from comparable studies of other continental fault systems with instrumentally observed earthquakes, such as in California, Mexico, Haiti, New Zealand, Alaska and Tibet.



More information about the unav_all mailing list