COMET Webinar - Tamarah King - TODAY 28 May 2020 - 16:00 UK time

Daniel Juncu D.Juncu at leeds.ac.uk
Thu May 28 10:19:53 UTC 2020


Dear Colleagues,


We would like to remind you that the next COMET webinar is on today:



Dr. Tamarah King (University of Oxford)

Movers and shakers down-under: what Australian surface ruptures tell us about intraplate faults, seismic hazard, and reverse earthquake strong ground motions. ​


The webinar will take place today, Thursday the 28th of May 2020, at 16:00 UK time (GMT+1).


If you want to attend the webinar please register at https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_OOf9PjNwT1ylO6PTDUyyIQ

(After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information on how to join the webinar)



Abstract

Australian earthquakes offer unique opportunities to investigate surface effects of reverse rupturing faults. Eleven historic surface-rupturing earthquakes (MW 4.7 – 6.6) have occurred since 1968 in arid, low-relief, bedrock dominated areas with little to no anthropogenic influence. These events provide inputs for many intraplate and global scaling relationships, yet remote-sensing techniques and reassessment of published historic data raises questions regarding how to define fault length, offset and width values, with implications for the accuracy of scaling relationships reliant on these inputs. Available geological and geophysical data from ten of these events indicate that rupture propagated parallel to the trace of, and possibly along, pre-existing Precambrian bedrock structures, with no unambiguous geological evidence for preceding surface-rupturing earthquakes. The apparent lack of recurrence on historically rupturing faults has implications for how ‘active’ faults and ‘slip-rates’ are defined for seismic hazard analysis in intraplate stable continental regions, and raises questions for how strain accumulates and dissipates in these crustal settings. Finally, in the absence of near-field instrumentation, the direction and distances of 1,437 co-seismically displaced rock fragments (chips) provide a dense proxy-record of strong ground motion directionality in the near-field of a MW 6.1 earthquake in Central Australia.




Best wishes,


Daniel Juncu & Fabien Albino

COMET - Centre for the Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonics

https://comet.nerc.ac.uk/

@NERC_COMET<https://twitter.com/nerc_comet?lang=en>

COMET webinars on youtube<https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtFDytX1hgjvlS4NH48M2oQ/videos>

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