Reminder - COMET Webinar: Sophie Miocevich (University of Cambridge) and Dan Gittins (University of Oxford). 23 February 2022

Scott Watson C.S.Watson at leeds.ac.uk
Mon Feb 21 14:57:34 UTC 2022


Reminder of upcoming webinar

Dear Colleagues,

COMET (The Centre for Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tectonics) invites you to the next instalment of our COMET webinar series with a great line up of two student presenters, viewable from the home office.

Testing the importance of sagduction: Insights from the structure and petrology of the Lewisian Gneiss Complex, northwest Scotland

Sophie Miocevich, University of Cambridge, UK

Characterizing the along-strike length of creep events along the San Andreas Fault.

Dan Gittins (University of Oxford)

Wednesday 23rd February 2022 at 4pm UK time (4pm UTC / 5pm CET / 8am PST)

Please register at: https://universityofleeds.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_JvI7XGefQyeJG1x4jB6XRQ

(After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information on how to join the webinar)

Testing the importance of sagduction: Insights from the structure and petrology of the Lewisian Gneiss Complex, northwest Scotland
Abstract:
Archean cratons often contain rock units that are interpreted as having been juxtaposed from different structural levels. A range of uniformitarian and non-uniformitarian processes are suggested to explain these occurrences. 'Sagduction' is one such process. Sagduction involves the density-driven 'sagging' of high-density upper-crustal lithologies into the underlying dominantly felsic mid-crust. We integrate petrology, phase equilibria modelling, and mechanical modelling to investigate the geological importance of sagduction, using the Lewisian Gneiss Complex of northwest Scotland as a test case. Our results suggest sagduction is not responsible for emplacement of observed subordinate lithologies within the Lewisian felsic mid-crust, and instead support uniformitarian tectonic interpretations. Additionally, our results cast doubt on the importance of sagduction in the structural evolution of granite-greenstone belts. Overall, our study indicates that sagduction was not an important Archean tectonic process.



Characterizing the along-strike length of creep events along the San Andreas Fault.

Abstract:

Creep has been observed on the San Andreas Fault since the 1960s and is known to occur at a steady background rate punctuated by bursts of slip. These few-mm bursts of slip are known as creep events, and they typically last a few hours to days and recur every few weeks to months. However, despite observations since the 1960s, we still do not know how large creep events are or the driving process behind them. In this study, we use 18 USGS creepmeters to systematically detect creep events and determine their along-strike lengths. We are able to identify 2120 creep events and categorize them into five different length behaviors, ranging from isolated events to events that extend to several kilometers along strike or even events that rupture multiple strands of the fault.



Catch up on past COMET and COMET+ webinars on our YouTube page: https:/www.youtube.com/channel/UCtFDytX1hgjvlS4NH48M2oQ/video<https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtFDytX1hgjvlS4NH48M2oQ/videos>



Best wishes,

Scott Watson & Tamarah King



COMET - Centre for the Observation and Modelling of Earthquakes, Volcanoes and Tectonics

https://comet.nerc.ac.uk/

@NERC_COMET<https://twitter.com/nerc_comet?lang=en>

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