<div dir="ltr"><div>Dear Colleagues,</div><div><br></div><div>Please consider submitting an abstract to our session at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting in Seattle: <b>Towards a 3D Seismic Model for Cascadia: Foundations, Construction and Applications</b>. Abstracts are accepted until <b>January 11, 2019</b>, and can be submitted here: <a href="https://www.seismosoc.org/meetings/submission-system/">https://www.seismosoc.org/meetings/submission-system/</a></div><div><br></div><div><p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin:0px 0px 10px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-variant-numeric:inherit;font-variant-east-asian:inherit;font-stretch:inherit;font-size:13px;line-height:18px;font-family:Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;vertical-align:baseline;background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;outline:none;color:rgb(51,51,51)"><b>Session Description</b></p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin:0px 0px 10px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-variant-numeric:inherit;font-variant-east-asian:inherit;font-stretch:inherit;font-size:13px;line-height:18px;font-family:Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;vertical-align:baseline;background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;outline:none;color:rgb(51,51,51)">The Cascadia subduction zone represents one of the largest potential hazards for earthquakes in the United States. It is also one of the most seismically well instrumented subduction zones globally, due in part to EarthScope, the Cascadia Initiative and its role as a Geoprisms focus site, as well as to active source experiments spanning several decades. In particular, experiments in the last five years have yielded an increase in multiscale seismic data sensitive to the forearc, which has traditionally been an elusive region to image and monitor. The new data have thus far yielded improved catalogs of offshore seismicity, detailed images of the seismic structure of the accretionary wedge and plate interface offshore and shoreline-crossing seismic images extending from the upper lithosphere through the upper asthenosphere across the entire margin. Many questions, however, remain. How do we link seismic imaging observations that range from small scale upper crustal constraints to along margin asthenospheric images? What are the challenges to using this new multi-frequency amphibious seismic data in the forearc? How can these observational results be integrated with other current and future experiments, models and observations? In this session, we invite submissions that highlight recent studies using multifrequency seismic techniques, particularly using data from the forearc in Cascadia and advances in multidisciplinary integrative approaches towards describing the Cascadia subduction system.</p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin:0px 0px 10px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-variant-numeric:inherit;font-variant-east-asian:inherit;font-stretch:inherit;font-size:13px;line-height:18px;font-family:Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;vertical-align:baseline;background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;outline:none;color:rgb(51,51,51)"><span style="box-sizing:border-box;margin:0px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-style:inherit;font-variant:inherit;font-weight:700;font-stretch:inherit;font-size:inherit;line-height:inherit;font-family:inherit;vertical-align:baseline;background:transparent;outline:none">Conveners</span></p><p style="box-sizing:border-box;margin:0px 0px 10px;padding:0px;border:0px;font-variant-numeric:inherit;font-variant-east-asian:inherit;font-stretch:inherit;font-size:13px;line-height:18px;font-family:Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;vertical-align:baseline;background-image:initial;background-position:initial;background-size:initial;background-repeat:initial;background-origin:initial;background-clip:initial;outline:none;color:rgb(51,51,51)">Helen A. Janiszewski, Carnegie Institution for Science (<a href="mailto:hjaniszewski@carnegiescience.edu">hjaniszewski@carnegiescience.edu</a>)<br style="box-sizing:border-box"><br style="box-sizing:border-box">Kevin M. Ward, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology (<a href="mailto:kevin.ward@sdsmt.edu">kevin.ward@sdsmt.edu</a>)<br style="box-sizing:border-box"><br style="box-sizing:border-box">Anne M. Trehu, Oregon State University (<a href="mailto:trehu@coas.oregonstate.edu">trehu@coas.oregonstate.edu</a>)</p></div><div><br></div><div>Best,</div><div>Helen</div><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature" data-smartmail="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br><span style="font-size:12.8px"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">Dr. Helen A. Janiszewski</font></span></div><div dir="ltr"><font face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif" color="#000000"><br></font><div><font size="1" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif" color="#000000">Postdoctoral Fellow<br></font><div><div><font size="1" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif" color="#000000">Dept. of Terrestrial Magnetism</font></div><div><font size="1" face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif" color="#000000">Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington DC</font></div><font color="#999999" size="1"><br><a href="https://helenjaniszewski.squarespace.com" target="_blank">https://helenjaniszewski.squarespace.com</a></font></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div>