<div dir="ltr">Dear Colleagues,<br><br>We invite you to submit an abstract to our 2022 AGU Fall Meeting session: <a href="https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm22/prelim.cgi/Session/157148">T011 - Multiscale Crustal Deformation in Subduction Zones and the Megathrust Earthquake Cycle: Progress from Observations and Models</a>. The meeting will be held in Chicago, IL and Online Everywhere December 12-16, and your abstracts are due by August 3.<br><br>Details of the session are provided below. We hope to see you in Chicago or online at the meeting!<br><br>Sincerely,<br>Matthew Herman (CSU Bakersfield)<br>Haipeng Luo (McGill University)<br>Aron Meltzner (Nanyang Technological University)<br>Donna Shillington (Northern Arizona University)<br><br>Invited Speakers:<br>Victor Manuel Cruz Atienza (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México)<br><div>Tina Dura (Virginia Tech)</div><div><br></div><br><b>T011 - Multiscale Crustal Deformation in Subduction Zones and the Megathrust Earthquake Cycle: Progress from Observations and Models</b><br>The timescales of deformation in subduction zones span seconds to millions of years. Associated with these timescales is a spectrum of deformation behavior, from elastic to permanent brittle or ductile. The patterns of slip on the plate boundary throughout the megathrust earthquake cycle and the rheology of crust and mantle are central to this deformation. There is also a complex relationship between short- and long-term deformation processes. Observations from modern seismology, geodesy, paleogeodesy, geophysics, and geology along with advances in modeling capabilities are revealing the details of these processes. As a result, there is much new understanding of the crustal deformation at subduction margins across time and space in association with megathrust coupling/slip and subduction zone rheology along with other tectonic and non-tectonic processes. We welcome submissions on all aspects of crustal deformation to explore the geodynamic processes governing earthquake cycles and the long-term evolution of the subduction margins.</div>